Month: January 2015

Endeca Information Discovery Integration with Oracle BI Apps 11.1.1.8.1

One of the new features that made its way into Oracle BI Apps 11.1.1.8.1, and that completely passed me by at the time, was integration with Oracle Endeca Information Discovery 3.1 via a new ODI11g plug-in. As this new integration brings the Endeca “faceted search” and semi-structured data analysis capabilities to the BI Apps this […]

OurSQL Episode 204: Just For Laughs

PodcastsGeneral

When we went monthly at the end of 2014, did you worry that we would forget our blooper show? This month’s podcast is a blooper reel just for you – about 35 minutes of put-a-smile-on-your-face fun with insight as to how things work – or don’t work – behind-the-scenes.
I hope your 2015 is going well!

WebScaleSQL builds for the MySQL Community

We have been looking at the WebScaleSQL project with great excitement. As with any new enhancements to the MySQL world, we need to test extensively to ensure we can give PSCE customers the best advice possible. Since this project is source only, we decided to add WebScaleSQL builds to our repo, so we could examine the changes being introduced by all the different collaborators.

So what is WebscaleSQL?
WebScaleSQL is a collaboration among engineers from several companies that face the same challenges in deploying MySQL at scale, and seek greater performance from a database technology tailored for their needs.
– WebScaleSQL, Frequently Asked Questions

What makes this project so special, is the level of collaboration between some of the most prestigious teams working with the MySQL technology, currently WebScaleSQL includes contributions from MySQL engineering teams at Alibaba, Facebook, Google, LinkedIn, and Twitter.
The repo is available repo.psce.com and is currently producing builds for Debian, with work going on to broaden the builds to CentOS and other distributions.
The repo functions much like any other, use the following steps to download test builds.
Ubuntu/Debian
apt-key adv –keyserver keyserver.ubuntu.com –recv-keys 2570689B
deb http://repo.psce.com/psce/apt main

or
add-apt-repository http://repo.psce.com/psce/apt
Let us know if you find this useful and watch out for more posts on the subject as we add more builds.

a multisource replication scenario: 10 masters, 1 slave.

A customer asked whether we they could have 10 or more masters consolidate all the data into a single central slave. After getting a bit more information from them and seeing the application functionality, it was clear that MySQL Labs 5.7.5 Multi Source Replication could be a good candidate. Why?:
– Each master is independent from the rest of the masters.
– One-way traffic: there is only one way to update a row, and that’s from the master.
– All the masters use the same schema and table, but no single master will ever need to, nor be able to update a row from another master.
– PK determined via app & master env.
Multisource replication is still in http://labs.mysql.com, but here’s what I did to test it out.
First, I read:
http://on-mysql-replication.blogspot.se/2013/09/mysql-labs-multi-source-replication.html
Then, downloaded what I needed from labs.mysql.com:
mysql-5.7.5-labs-msr-preview-linux-el6-x86_64.tar.gz
And tried for myself:
cd /opt/mysql/msr
mkdir -p 3100/data 3001/data 3002/data 3003/data 3004/data 3005/data 3006/data 3007/data 3008/data 3009/data 3010/data
How many masters do I want to test? Well.. for now 10, but I’ll see later how far I can go.
My setup will look like the following, all on the same host:
datadirs, port, socket location, server-id (1-10, 100):
3100               the single slave
3001 – 3010   the 10 masters
and a my.cnf that will let me use multi_mysqld and make my life a whole lot easier, as all this is being done on a single machine:
[mysqld_safe]
log-error                       =/opt/mysql/msr/mysqld.log

[mysqld_multi]
#no-log
log                             =/usr/local/mysql-5.7.5-labs-msr-preview-linux-el6-x86_64/msr/mysqld_multi.log
mysqld                          =/usr/local/mysql-5.7.5-labs-msr-preview-linux-el6-x86_64/bin/mysqld_safe
mysqladmin                      =/usr/local/mysql-5.7.5-labs-msr-preview-linux-el6-x86_64/bin/mysqladmin
user                            =root
password                        =pass

[mysqld]
basedir                         =/usr/local/mysql-5.7.5-labs-msr-preview-linux-el6-x86_64
performance-schema-instrument   =’%=ON’

[mysqld3100]
server-id                       =3100
mysqld                          =/usr/local/mysql-5.7.5-labs-msr-preview-linux-el6-x86_64/bin/mysqld_safe
ledir                           =/usr/local/mysql-5.7.5-labs-msr-preview-linux-el6-x86_64/bin
port                            =3100
pid-file                        =/opt/mysql/msr/3100/pchost_3100.pid
socket                          =/opt/mysql/msr/3100/mysql.sock
datadir                         =/opt/mysql/msr/3100/data
log-error                       =/opt/mysql/msr/3100/msr.err
innodb_buffer_pool_size         =40M
innodb_file_per_table           =1
innodb_log_buffer_size          =2M
innodb_log_file_size            =12M
innodb_flush_log_at_trx_commit  =2
innodb_data_file_path           =ibdata1:12M;ibdata2:12M:autoextend
innodb_open_files               =50
language                        =/usr/local/mysql-5.7.5-labs-msr-preview-linux-el6-x86_64/share/english
table_open_cache                =80
open_files_limit                =100
query_cache_size                =0
max_connections                 =10
user                            =mysql
# Replication
#log-bin                        =3100
binlog-row-image                =minimal
binlog-rows-query-log-events    =1
log-slave-updates               =TRUE
gtid-mode                       =ON
enforce-gtid-consistency =TRUE
master-info-repository =TABLE
relay-log-info-repository =TABLE
sync_binlog =1
sync_master_info =1
slave-parallel-workers =2
slave_transaction_retries =0
binlog-checksum =CRC32
master-verify-checksum =1
slave-sql-verify-checksum =1
binlog-rows-query-log-events =1
binlog_format =ROW
report-host =pchost
report-port =3100
replicate-ignore-db =nexus

[mysqld3001]
server-id =3001
mysqld =/usr/local/mysql-5.7.5-labs-msr-preview-linux-el6-x86_64/bin/mysqld_safe
ledir =/usr/local/mysql-5.7.5-labs-msr-preview-linux-el6-x86_64/bin
port =3001
pid-file =/opt/mysql/msr/3001/pchost_3001.pid

[mysqld3002]

[mysqld3003]

..
[mysqld3010]

All entries were the same for each [mysqld300x] except for the obvious, i.e. port, datadir, socket, pid, etc.
And once that’s done, install each server’s datadir, from 3100, 3001 to 3010:
bin/mysql_install_db –user=mysql –datadir=/opt/mysql/msr/3100/data –basedir=/usr/local/mysql-5.7.5-m15-linux-glibc2.5-x86_64
bin/mysqld_multi –defaults-file=/usr/local/mysql/msr/my.cnf  start 3100
cat ~/.mysql_secret
bin/mysqladmin -uroot -p -S/opt/mysql/msr/3100/mysql.sock password ‘pass’
Remember, this is 5.7.5 Labs, i.e. be aware of some changes occurring here (bin/mysql_install_db).
Let’s comment out the log-bin entry on all 10 masters first, as I don’t want some things I’m about to do to be logged and cause replication to break before I start it all up:
bin/mysqld_multi –defaults-file=/usr/local/mysql/msr/my.cnf  stop 3001-3010
bin/mysqld_multi –defaults-file=/usr/local/mysql/msr/my.cnf  start 3001-3010
Now, on all the masters, 3001-3010 and on the slave, 3100, create the table:
 create database coredb;
 use coredb;
 create table recording_data (
   centre_code SET(‘A’,’AB’,’AC’,’AL’,’B’,’BI’,’BU’,’C’,’CA’,’CE’,’CO’,’CU’) NOT NULL,
   case_id INT NOT NULL,
   user_email VARCHAR(55) NOT NULL,
   start_info DATETIME NOT NULL,
   end_info DATETIME NOT NULL,
   INDEX (user_email),
   PRIMARY KEY (centre_code,case_id)
 );
The app at each master has programming logic and config that will force each user to use the default value for centre_code for that specific centre and not be able to adjust this in anyway.
Also, case_id could be autoincrement, but for simplistic sake I will force a common id just to prove my point.
These 2 factors mean that when multi source replication occurs on the slave, each row will be unique from each master, i.e. no need for conflict resolution or headaches along those lines.
Now, for the masters, uncomment log-bin again, as we’ll obviously need it, and restart masters 3001-3010.
Create the replication user on each master (from a single slave, so it will be same one for all the masters):
create user ‘rpl’@’localhost’ identified by ”;
grant replication slave on *.*   to ‘rpl’@’localhost’;
Lets get replicating: go to the slave and create all the channels for each individual master:
change master to master_host=’localhost’, master_user=’rpl’, master_port=3001,  master_auto_position=1 for channel “CHANNEL1”;
change master to master_host=’localhost’, master_user=’rpl’, master_port=3002,  master_auto_position=1 for channel “CHANNEL2”;
change master to master_host=’localhost’, master_user=’rpl’, master_port=3003,  master_auto_position=1 for channel “CHANNEL3”;

change master to master_host=’localhost’, master_user=’rpl’, master_port=3010,  master_auto_position=1 for channel “CHANNEL10”;
And start each channel:
start slave for channel “CHANNEL1”;
start slave for channel “CHANNEL2”;
start slave for channel “CHANNEL3”;

start slave for channel “CHANNEL10”;
Right.. all’s well, but now for some data.
We insert some data, unique to each master, and see what happens:
On master 3001:
 use coredb
 insert into recording_data values
  (‘A’,1234567890,’prueba1@test.com’,sysdate()-1,sysdate()+1),
  (‘A’,1234567891,’prueba1@test.com’,sysdate()-1,sysdate()+1),
  (‘A’,1234567893,’prueba1@test.com’,sysdate()-1,sysdate()+1)
 ;
On master 3002:
 use coredb
 insert into recording_data values
  (‘AB’,1234567890,’prueba1@test.com’,sysdate()-1,sysdate()+1),
  (‘AB’,1234567891,’prueba1@test.com’,sysdate()-1,sysdate()+1),
  (‘AB’,1234567893,’prueba1@test.com’,sysdate()-1,sysdate()+1)
 ;

On master 3010:
 use coredb
 insert into recording_data values
  (‘CE’,1234567890,’prueba1@test.com’,sysdate()-1,sysdate()+1),
  (‘CE’,1234567891,’prueba1@test.com’,sysdate()-1,sysdate()+1),
  (‘CE’,1234567893,’prueba1@test.com’,sysdate()-1,sysdate()+1)
 ;
And on the slave 3100, what do we see:
bin/mysql -uroot -p -S/opt/mysql/msr/3100/mysql.sock

mysql> use coredb;
Database changed
mysql> select * from recording_data ;
+————-+————+——————+———————+———————+
| centre_code | case_id    | user_email       | start_info          | end_info            |
+————-+————+——————+———————+———————+
| A           | 1234567890 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-26 19:02:08 | 2015-01-26 19:02:10 |
| A           | 1234567891 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-26 19:02:08 | 2015-01-26 19:02:10 |
| A           | 1234567893 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-26 19:02:08 | 2015-01-26 19:02:10 |
| AB          | 1234567890 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-26 19:02:25 | 2015-01-26 19:02:27 |
| AB          | 1234567891 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-26 19:02:25 | 2015-01-26 19:02:27 |
| AB          | 1234567893 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-26 19:02:25 | 2015-01-26 19:02:27 |
| AC          | 1234567890 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-27 12:59:48 | 2015-01-27 12:59:50 |
| AC          | 1234567891 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-27 12:59:48 | 2015-01-27 12:59:50 |
| AC          | 1234567893 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-27 12:59:48 | 2015-01-27 12:59:50 |
| AL          | 1234567890 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-27 13:13:35 | 2015-01-27 13:13:37 |
| AL          | 1234567891 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-27 13:13:35 | 2015-01-27 13:13:37 |
| AL          | 1234567893 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-27 13:13:35 | 2015-01-27 13:13:37 |
| B           | 1234567890 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-27 13:13:56 | 2015-01-27 13:13:58 |
| B           | 1234567891 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-27 13:13:56 | 2015-01-27 13:13:58 |
| B           | 1234567893 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-27 13:13:56 | 2015-01-27 13:13:58 |
| BI          | 1234567890 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-27 13:15:16 | 2015-01-27 13:15:18 |
| BI          | 1234567891 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-27 13:15:16 | 2015-01-27 13:15:18 |
| BI          | 1234567893 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-27 13:15:16 | 2015-01-27 13:15:18 |
| BU          | 1234567890 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-27 13:15:34 | 2015-01-27 13:15:36 |
| BU          | 1234567891 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-27 13:15:34 | 2015-01-27 13:15:36 |
| BU          | 1234567893 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-27 13:15:34 | 2015-01-27 13:15:36 |
| C           | 1234567890 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-27 13:15:52 | 2015-01-27 13:15:54 |
| C           | 1234567891 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-27 13:15:52 | 2015-01-27 13:15:54 |
| C           | 1234567893 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-27 13:15:52 | 2015-01-27 13:15:54 |
| CA          | 1234567890 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-27 13:16:11 | 2015-01-27 13:16:13 |
| CA          | 1234567891 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-27 13:16:11 | 2015-01-27 13:16:13 |
| CA          | 1234567893 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-27 13:16:11 | 2015-01-27 13:16:13 |
| CE          | 1234567890 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-27 13:16:30 | 2015-01-27 13:16:32 |
| CE          | 1234567891 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-27 13:16:30 | 2015-01-27 13:16:32 |
| CE          | 1234567893 | prueba1@test.com | 2015-01-27 13:16:30 | 2015-01-27 13:16:32 |
+————-+————+——————+———————+———————+
30 rows in set (0,00 sec)
And as mentioned in MySQL Labs: Multi Source Replication – examples now to use Performance Schema to see all my masters:
mysql> select * from performance_schema.replication_execute_status_by_worker;
+————–+———–+———–+—————+—————————————-+——————-+——————–+———————-+
| CHANNEL_NAME | WORKER_ID | THREAD_ID | SERVICE_STATE | LAST_SEEN_TRANSACTION                  | LAST_ERROR_NUMBER | LAST_ERROR_MESSAGE | LAST_ERROR_TIMESTAMP |
+————–+———–+———–+—————+—————————————-+——————-+——————–+———————-+
| channel1     |         1 |        27 | ON            | c1b91daa-a55a-11e4-be70-b86b23917877:6 |                 0 |                    | 0000-00-00 00:00:00  |
| channel1     |         2 |        28 | ON            | c1b91daa-a55a-11e4-be70-b86b23917877:7 |                 0 |                    | 0000-00-00 00:00:00  |
| channel2     |         1 |        44 | ON            | fd35c073-a55e-11e4-be8c-b86b23917877:7 |                 0 |                    | 0000-00-00 00:00:00  |
| channel2     |         2 |        45 | ON            | fd35c073-a55e-11e4-be8c-b86b23917877:8 |                 0 |                    | 0000-00-00 00:00:00  |
| channel3     |         1 |        50 | ON            | 3183d919-a569-11e4-bece-b86b23917877:1 |                 0 |                    | 0000-00-00 00:00:00  |
| channel3     |         2 |        51 | ON            | 3183d919-a569-11e4-bece-b86b23917877:2 |                 0 |                    | 0000-00-00 00:00:00  |
| channel4     |         1 |        54 | ON            | 2205d704-a56c-11e4-bee1-b86b23917877:1 |                 0 |                    | 0000-00-00 00:00:00  |
| channel4     |         2 |        55 | ON            | 2205d704-a56c-11e4-bee1-b86b23917877:2 |                 0 |                    | 0000-00-00 00:00:00  |
| channel5     |         1 |        58 | ON            | 3e007b4e-a56c-11e4-bee2-b86b23917877:1 |                 0 |                    | 0000-00-00 00:00:00  |
| channel5     |         2 |        59 | ON            | 3e007b4e-a56c-11e4-bee2-b86b23917877:4 |                 0 |                    | 0000-00-00 00:00:00  |
| channel6     |         1 |        62 | ON            | fecf246b-a616-11e4-833c-7c7a91bc3176:1 |                 0 |                    | 0000-00-00 00:00:00  |
| channel6     |         2 |        63 | ON            | fecf246b-a616-11e4-833c-7c7a91bc3176:2 |                 0 |                    | 0000-00-00 00:00:00  |
| channel7     |         1 |        66 | ON            | 6ccfd319-a617-11e4-833f-7c7a91bc3176:1 |                 0 |                    | 0000-00-00 00:00:00  |
| channel7     |         2 |        67 | ON            | 6ccfd319-a617-11e4-833f-7c7a91bc3176:2 |                 0 |                    | 0000-00-00 00:00:00  |
| channel8     |         1 |        70 | ON            | a800f433-a617-11e4-8341-7c7a91bc3176:1 |                 0 |                    | 0000-00-00 00:00:00  |
| channel8     |         2 |        71 | ON            | a800f433-a617-11e4-8341-7c7a91bc3176:2 |                 0 |                    | 0000-00-00 00:00:00  |
| channel9     |         1 |        74 | ON            | bd6fac63-a617-11e4-8341-7c7a91bc3176:1 |                 0 |                    | 0000-00-00 00:00:00  |
| channel9     |         2 |        75 | ON            | bd6fac63-a617-11e4-8341-7c7a91bc3176:2 |                 0 |                    | 0000-00-00 00:00:00  |
| channel10    |         1 |        78 | ON            | d1d47dec-a618-11e4-8348-7c7a91bc3176:1 |                 0 |                    | 0000-00-00 00:00:00  |
| channel10    |         2 |        79 | ON            | d1d47dec-a618-11e4-8348-7c7a91bc3176:2 |                 0 |                    | 0000-00-00 00:00:00  |
+————–+———–+———–+—————+—————————————-+——————-+——————–+———————-+
20 rows in set (0,00 sec)
So what’s next? In my “to do” list I’ve got:
– Evaluate performance impact on the slave as a new master is added. Today: 10, tomorrow: 50, next week: the www.
– See how the slave impact increases and hence, server resources. CPU will be key I expect, due to the number of channels, but then also will depend on how frequently each master sends it’s own load of bin logs and the size of them, network will be hard for me to look into here, as it’s all self-contained….
BRB.

Managing Complex Multimedia Sessions, more than just raising alarms (SDM) by Eva Pavon

Oracle Communication’s Session Delivery Manager provides an advanced framework for provisioning, managing, and monitoring session delivery networks. Session Delivery Manager has an advanced architecture, called Service Oriented Architecture (SOA), which provides such features as increased scalability using load balancing across clustered servers, the ability to load Session Delivery Manager Configurations on-demand, and a rich thin-client interface. You can use the enhanced user interface to access such services as Element Manager for configuring Oracle Communications SBCs or Route Manager for configuring LRTs on Oracle Communications SBCs.
Session Delivery Manager also includes a dashboard summary view of key performance indicators for the managed devices and provides three different views into Oracle Communications SBC configuration elements: Default, List, and ACLI.

Element Manager 2.0
Oracle Communications Session Delivery Manager’s Element Manager Application allows for the loading, configuring, and managing of devices, (Net-Net SBC). This release of Oracle Communications Session Delivery Manager can manage the following devices:

  • C-Series—The Net-Net 4000 series contains two systems: the Net-Net 4250 and Net-Net 4500. The Net-Net 3000 series contains two systems: the Net-Net 3800 (Sku 3810) and Net-Net 3820.
  • D-Series—Also known as the Net-Net 9000 series, it contains one system: the Net-Net 9200.
  • E-Series—Also known as the Net-Net 2000 series, it contains one system: the Net-Net 2600.

Multimedia Sessions

The Session Delivery Manager Northbound Fault Management allows you to configure destination receivers to receive forwarded traps in either SDM or ITU X.733 standard formats. You can specify selected traps on devices using the ITU X.733 format in the Add/Edit trap receiver dialog. A maximum of 10 trap receivers may be configured at once, regardless of format.
The SDM server receives the alarms from SBCs and forwards them to selected devices.

Multimedia Sessions

In this diagram, the SBC sends all traps to the SDM server, which sorts them into events and alarms. Events are the aggregated list of all such messages while alarms record only the current state or latest event. Imagine the SBC first sends a trap indicating the fan is operating at 10% and later sends a trap indicating the fan is operating at 50%. In SDM, the alarms tab will display the trap indicating the fan is operating at 50%, whereas the events tab will display both traps.

New Features / Applications in Session Delivery Networks (SDM) 7.4
Report Manager 2.0

Beginning with SDM 7.4, the Report Manager uses the Oracle BI Publisher to manage and render reports. BI Publisher is a complete reporting solution to author, manage, and deliver reports.
The previous reporting tool in NNC 7.3 has been obsoleted. Unlike its predecessor, BI Publisher allows users to create their own reports and dashboards as well as schedule and print out these reports in the multiple formats. Users can also monitor their system with the canned reports.
If you’ve been using a previous version of Report Manager, pay close attention to the Installation Guide, especially for the additional options about reporting database migration.

Offline Configuration
Offline configurations are configurations that can be applied to multiple devices, in order to share the same configuration data. An offline configuration is created by duplicating an existing managed device configuration or by selecting a schema from a supported software model.
Data variables allow network administrators to target elements that require device specific information, when duplicating an existing configuration. All data variables must have new values in order to push the configuration to a device.

Device Clustering
A device cluster is a collection of devices sharing the same hardware, software, and configuration. By specifying an offline configuration and adding devices to a device cluster, SEM allows you to synchronize configuration changes across all members of the cluster.
Members a device cluster must share the same software version and device credentials in order to share the same configuration. Device-specific parameters can be targeted as data variables, in order to set different values for each member.

Application Orchestrator
The Oracle Communications Application Orchestrator (AO) manages the virtual network function (VNF) life-cycle and provides a central location for integrating and managing multiple virtualization infrastructure management (VIM) systems.
AO provides a virtualization management framework for provisioning commands to virtual hosts while collecting performance information on actively deployed VM instances.
Elasticity mode enables AO to respond to changes in network capacity requirements by calculating thresholds on key performance indicators. AO automatically provisions virtual devices to meet demand. AO also allows for manual setup and deployment of individual virtual devices.

Multimedia Sessions

Example Configuration
VM groups are a logical grouping of VMs that share configuration and scaling thresholds.An offline configuration template is required in order to configure a VM group. See example below:

Multimedia Sessions

VM instances are singular or HA paired VNF deployments assigned to a specific VM group. VM instances cannot deploy unless the device-specific data variables are configured for each instance. The Configure device wizard walks through the steps of configuring device-specific boot parameters and data variables.

More information:
If you would like to find out more about the Session Delivery Manager, I advise taking the following soon to be released Oracle University course: Oracle Session Delivery Manager Operation and Configuration Ed 1 LVC (3 days).

See all of the available training for Acme Packet products.

To view scheduled Acme Packet Training events in Europe, the Middle East and Africa please click here.

Oracle University provides courses in traditional classroom and live virtual class formats. Custom and private training events can be arranged to suit your exact training requirements.

If you have any questions about the above or require training advice, please contact me: eva.pavon.martin@oracle.com.

Eva PavonEva Pavon, Telecommunication Engineer – Polytechnic University of Madrid (UPM), is a very detail oriented Technical Instructor/Developer having international experience delivering training in English, French, and Spanish language. With 18 years of experience in telecommunication and after starting as a developer for Telefónica R&D and working in a Consultancy firm, she joined Lucent Technologies Training Department in 2000 starting the teaching history for 10 years (SDH/WDM, Data/IP and Security in IP networks) and having excellent customer feedback and recognition. After a period of new experiences as a Product Manager in Huawei and Account Manager in McAfee she decided to join Acme Packet (Acquired by Oracle in 2013) and continue with her passion, teaching in a great company and the best training team. After 3 years in the company she can deliver classes for SBC, CAB-C/D, TS-C/D, ADV, SEC, SDM, OCOM, ISR, CSM/USM and constantly receives outstanding feedback on her deliveries.

Managing Complex Multimedia Sessions, more than just raising alarms (SDM) by Eva Pavon

Oracle Communication’s Session Delivery Manager provides an advanced framework for provisioning, managing, and monitoring session delivery networks. Session Delivery Manager has an advanced architecture, called Service Oriented Architecture (SOA), which provides such features as increased scalability using load balancing across clustered servers, the ability to load Session Delivery Manager Configurations on-demand, and a rich thin-client interface. You can use the enhanced user interface to access such services as Element Manager for configuring Oracle Communications SBCs or Route Manager for configuring LRTs on Oracle Communications SBCs.
Session Delivery Manager also includes a dashboard summary view of key performance indicators for the managed devices and provides three different views into Oracle Communications SBC configuration elements: Default, List, and ACLI.

Element Manager 2.0
Oracle Communications Session Delivery Manager’s Element Manager Application allows for the loading, configuring, and managing of devices, (Net-Net SBC). This release of Oracle Communications Session Delivery Manager can manage the following devices:

  • C-Series—The Net-Net 4000 series contains two systems: the Net-Net 4250 and Net-Net 4500. The Net-Net 3000 series contains two systems: the Net-Net 3800 (Sku 3810) and Net-Net 3820.
  • D-Series—Also known as the Net-Net 9000 series, it contains one system: the Net-Net 9200.
  • E-Series—Also known as the Net-Net 2000 series, it contains one system: the Net-Net 2600.

Multimedia Sessions

The Session Delivery Manager Northbound Fault Management allows you to configure destination receivers to receive forwarded traps in either SDM or ITU X.733 standard formats. You can specify selected traps on devices using the ITU X.733 format in the Add/Edit trap receiver dialog. A maximum of 10 trap receivers may be configured at once, regardless of format.
The SDM server receives the alarms from SBCs and forwards them to selected devices.

Multimedia Sessions

In this diagram, the SBC sends all traps to the SDM server, which sorts them into events and alarms. Events are the aggregated list of all such messages while alarms record only the current state or latest event. Imagine the SBC first sends a trap indicating the fan is operating at 10% and later sends a trap indicating the fan is operating at 50%. In SDM, the alarms tab will display the trap indicating the fan is operating at 50%, whereas the events tab will display both traps.

New Features / Applications in Session Delivery Networks (SDM) 7.4
Report Manager 2.0

Beginning with SDM 7.4, the Report Manager uses the Oracle BI Publisher to manage and render reports. BI Publisher is a complete reporting solution to author, manage, and deliver reports.
The previous reporting tool in NNC 7.3 has been obsoleted. Unlike its predecessor, BI Publisher allows users to create their own reports and dashboards as well as schedule and print out these reports in the multiple formats. Users can also monitor their system with the canned reports.
If you’ve been using a previous version of Report Manager, pay close attention to the Installation Guide, especially for the additional options about reporting database migration.

Offline Configuration
Offline configurations are configurations that can be applied to multiple devices, in order to share the same configuration data. An offline configuration is created by duplicating an existing managed device configuration or by selecting a schema from a supported software model.
Data variables allow network administrators to target elements that require device specific information, when duplicating an existing configuration. All data variables must have new values in order to push the configuration to a device.

Device Clustering
A device cluster is a collection of devices sharing the same hardware, software, and configuration. By specifying an offline configuration and adding devices to a device cluster, SEM allows you to synchronize configuration changes across all members of the cluster.
Members a device cluster must share the same software version and device credentials in order to share the same configuration. Device-specific parameters can be targeted as data variables, in order to set different values for each member.

Application Orchestrator
The Oracle Communications Application Orchestrator (AO) manages the virtual network function (VNF) life-cycle and provides a central location for integrating and managing multiple virtualization infrastructure management (VIM) systems.
AO provides a virtualization management framework for provisioning commands to virtual hosts while collecting performance information on actively deployed VM instances.
Elasticity mode enables AO to respond to changes in network capacity requirements by calculating thresholds on key performance indicators. AO automatically provisions virtual devices to meet demand. AO also allows for manual setup and deployment of individual virtual devices.

Multimedia Sessions

Example Configuration
VM groups are a logical grouping of VMs that share configuration and scaling thresholds.
An offline configuration template is required in order to configure a VM group. See example below:

Multimedia Sessions

VM instances are singular or HA paired VNF deployments assigned to a specific VM group. VM instances cannot deploy unless the device-specific data variables are configured for each instance. The Configure device wizard walks through the steps of configuring device-specific boot parameters and data variables.

More information:
If you would like to find out more about the Session Delivery Manager, I advise taking the following soon to be released Oracle University course: Oracle Session Delivery Manager Operation and Configuration Ed 1 LVC (3 days).

See all of the available training
for Acme Packet products
.
To view scheduled Acme Packet Training events in Europe, the Middle East and Africa please click here.

Oracle University provides courses in traditional classroom and live
virtual class
formats. Custom and private
training events
can be arranged to suit your exact training requirements.

If you have any questions about the above or require training advice, please
contact me: eva.pavon.martin@oracle.com.

Eva Pavon

Eva Pavon, Telecommunication Engineer – Polytechnic University of Madrid (UPM), is a very detail oriented Technical Instructor/Developer having international experience delivering training in English, French, and Spanish language. With 18 years of experience in telecommunication and after starting as a developer for Telefónica R&D and working in a Consultancy firm, she joined Lucent Technologies Training Department in 2000 starting the teaching history for 10 years (SDH/WDM, Data/IP and Security in IP networks) and having excellent customer feedback and recognition. After a period of new experiences as a Product Manager in Huawei and Account Manager in McAfee she decided to join Acme Packet (Acquired by Oracle in 2013) and continue with her passion, teaching in a great company and the best training team. After 3 years in the company she can deliver classes for SBC, CAB-C/D, TS-C/D, ADV, SEC, SDM, OCOM, ISR, CSM/USM and constantly receives outstanding feedback on her deliveries.

Load Balancing for MySQL with HAProxy – Webinar Replay in English & French

January 30, 2015

By Severalnines

In this joint webinar series with our friends from the HAProxy team, we covered the concepts around the popular open-source HAProxy load balancer, and demonstrated how to use it with SQL-based database clusters. We also discussed HA strategies for HAProxy with Keepalived and Virtual IP. 

 
Thanks to everyone who participated in these two sessions this week! Please see below for details on next week’s follow up session ‘Performance Tuning for HAProxy & MySQL’.
 
The topics covered this week included: 

What is HAProxy?
SQL Load balancing for MySQL
Failure detection using MySQL health checks
High Availability with Keepalived and Virtual IP
Use cases: MySQL/MariaDB Galera Cluster, MySQL NDB Cluster and MySQL Replication
Alternative methods: Database drivers with inbuilt cluster support, MySQL proxy, MaxScale, ProxySQL

 
Watch the replay – English
Load Balancing MySQL with HAProxy – Webinar Replay – English from Severalnines AB
 
Watch the replay – French
Load Balancing MySQL with HAProxy – Webinar Replay – French from Severalnines AB
 
Read the slides
Load Balancing MySQL with HAProxy – Slides from Severalnines AB
 
There is a follow up session next week on February 4th:
 
Performance Tuning for HAProxy and MySQL (English)
Performance Tuning for HAProxy and MySQL (French)
 
Baptiste Assmann, Product Manager at HAProxy Technologies, will be the main speaker at these sessions. 
 
The topics that will be covered include: 

Inside HAProxy
HAProxy multi-process: advantages, limitations, configuration
Dynamic re-configuration
What can HAProxy tell you about your application and your database
Weakness in MySQL client library
Hints for short live connections
Hints for persistent connections
HAProxy active/active failover setups
Security considerations

 
read more

Connectors Updated

Following on the heels of last week’s update to the Java client, the MariaDB project is pleased to today announce updates to both MariaDB Connector/C and Connector/ODBC. They are both Stable (GA) releases.
See the Release Notes and Changelogs for detailed information on each of these releases and contain many bug fixes and enhancements.

Download Connector/C 2.1.0
Release Notes Changelog
About MariaDB Connector/C

Download Connector/ODBC 1.0.0
Release Notes Changelog
About MariaDB Connector/ODBC

Thanks, and enjoy MariaDB!

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